Monsanto, the world’s most hated corporation, will stop at nothing to increase its profits, even if it means swindling struggling Indian farmers./p>

For generations, farmers have saved seeds from year to year — but the company has now made that illegal.

Monsanto is sowing the seeds of debt bondage by charging outrageous annual royalties to keep using their seeds. Farmers are hopelessly saddled with crippling debt. Since Monsanto’s crops were introduced, over 200,000 farmers in India have committed suicide.

Stand with India’s farmers & tell Monsanto to stop charging crippling royalties on its seeds.

http://action.sumofus.org/a/monsanto-royalties/?sub=taf

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More on weeds. Peter Andrews in ‘THE BUSH’.

In Don Watson’s THE BUSH he tells of Peter Andrew’s belief that weeds are in the eye of the beholder. In general he shares the view of the legendary environmentalist and scientist and writer, George Seddon, that weeds are ‘stateless persons with no civil rights’, ‘dissidents’, plants that don’t properly belong. Essentially, as Seddon says, plants are ranked as weeds if they are contrary to human intention. But what if the intentions are contrary to common sense? For Peter Andrews, so-called weeds are an essential aid to the lands regeneration. If blackberries and willows are holding the banks of the stream together, leave them there. Control them ( as I have done here ) by slashing, planting indigenous trees and DO NOT poison them. ( in our local valley, Wilson Creeks banks are collapsing after recent Coral tree poisonings) For Peter Andrews and a growing body of evidence, the residual effects of the poisons touch the workers who distribute them, the water, the food and the myriad of micro life our eyes can not see. These fact constitute one of the main arguments against herbicides and chemical farming in general. Another argument, now proven, that weeds look after the soil in hard times and restore it for our benefit. The weed, to quote an earlier admirer, is the ‘PIONEERING AGENT OF NATURE’.
From Page 261. The Bush by Don Watson.

lyre-bird-gully
The photo above is of a slashed and layered lantana gully in 1996 to today, where 20 different rain forest trees have germinated.

Next blog more from Don Watson on Round-up and Monsanto.

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Too slow Byron Shire.

London-based West Six and North One Garden Centres have stopped selling weedkiller Roundup after pressure from customers. The decision will see them become two of the first retailers in the UK to follow several European retailers that have withdrawn glyphosate-based products. Owner Beryl Henderson said customers’ concerns about reported health risks associated with the active ingredient glyphosate had led to both the garden centres taking the product off their shelves in June. North One local authority Hackney Council has come under pressure to ban herbicides, from a group using petition website 38 Degrees to lobby for action. It stated: “The Hackney mayor (Jules Pipe) also claims that there is no point banning the council from using Roundup if it is still available in garden centres. We plan to lobby local retailers and ask them to stop selling Roundup.” It continued: “PAN UK, starting with Brighton and Hove, wants to see a radical shift in thinking about pesticide use in towns and cities across the UK with the ultimate goal of the complete cessation of their use.” The campaign has the support of local groups including Brighton Breast Cancer Action and the Brighton & Hove Organic Garden Group. PAN UK said local campaigns are also emerging in Falmouth, Camden and Newcastle, as well as Hackney. Glyphosate was classified as “probably carcinogenic” in March.

In our Shire. poisoned For sale at Mitre Ten. labelAustralian Greens Acting Leader Senator Larissa Waters expressed the Greens’ deep sympathies to the family of Felicity Wishart who passed away on Sunday night, and paid tribute to her legacy as one of Australia’s leading conservationists.

“Our planet has lost a great champion and we mourn for her,” said Senator Waters.

“Felicity Wishart was a leading light in the conservation movement. She was part of every key environmental reform in Queensland in the past 15 years, as coordinator of the Queensland Conservation Council in the 2000s.

“She worked to stop broad scale land clearing, to protect wild rivers, and was a strong and courageous voice for protection of the natural world.

And farewell to an inspirational Environmentalist.

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/04/06/carbon-capture

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Silvereyes.

Not a very good photo but the best I could get. New camera too so learning my way around its possibilities. I have never seen so many silvereyes as are about here every morning.
new-camera

Yesterday too a single Lyre bird scurried into the brush in one of my regenerated gullies. Too fast to photograph. Not sure whether it was an Albert or a Superb. Great joy at seeing it, however briefly.

http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/2848400/its_not_just_glyphosate_and_neonicotinoids_why_we_need_a_pesticidefree_future.html

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Red Cedar.

In Don Watson’s “THE BUSH”, he tells us that the red cedar (Toona Ciliata) is hard to find outside of a half a dozen public gardens. However, he says, dead ones abound. In Sydney town Hall, for example: the interior of this mid-nineteenth century monster, by turns French Second Empire, Italian Renaissance, Jacobean and English Aesthetic in style, swallowed an unknown number of red cedars from the Hawksbury River stands. As the material of choice among mid-Victorian designers of public buildings, unpainted red cedar turns up in the walls or furnishings of town halls, parliaments, post offices, churches, libraries, courthouses and railway stations built on the eastern seaboard before 1880. being strong, light and durable, easily carved and turned, it was put to use in house frames and picture frames, interior panelling in trams and rail carriages, staircases, doors, floors, ceilings, shutters, window frames, skirting boards, mantelpieces, veneers, boats, cigar boxes,fine furniture and coffins.
From Don Watson.

red-cedar-2
I call this my red cedar parent tree due to its seedlings being transplanted throughout this property.
red
don-in-the-forest

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Wednesday.

Cool morning starting with clear blue sky. Vapour trails and feathery clouds. With-in an hour, haze and the sun.
sun-mullumbimby-15th
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/glyphosate-scientists-urge-caution-over-experts-claims-pesticide-is-probably-carcinogenic-10397787.html

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Gale force wind, power outages and sun.

present-work-site
Cooler weather has been ideal to continue slashing lantana at our present work-site.
ghostly-garden
embrace

http://www.theguardian.com/science/video/2015/jun/04/undercurrent-monsanto-roundup-pesticide-herbicide-who-carcinogenic-video?CMP=share_btn_fb

Herbicide free future ahead.

The Weed’s Network’s July 3rd Adelaide workshop for reducing herbicide use in weeding and vegetation management was filled to capacity. Participants were drawn from a wide range of professional roles, such as amenity horticulture, viticulture, landscape design and vegetation restoration. The day-long workshop featured eleven speakers who presented the latest practical knowledge on proven approaches to vegetation management without chemicals. Participants also gained insight into current public perceptions of the herbicide pollution and related health issues. A feature of the day was the roundtable peer discussions on the grounds of the University of Adelaide where participants shared their ideas on how to transition to non-chemical practices. Thank you to all our excellent presenters and to the great group of non-chemical weeding professionals and conservation volunteers who attended. A special thank you to Natural Resources Adelaide & Mt Lofty Ranges, Angove, Fiskars, Kalleske Wines, Nerada Tea and Organic Weed Control who generously supported the event. Interest in non-chemical weeding and vegetation is growing rapidly around the world due to the widespread development of herbicide resistance and growing public concerns over the health and environmental effects of using herbicide. Planning is now well underway for future workshops in Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, New Zealand and South Africa — for more information on The Weed’s Network’s approach to working with weeds and vegetation, or to organise a workshop in your region, please contact The Weed’s Network’s General Manager Dr David Low.

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