To poison or not to poison .

The week-end has just past. Beautiful weather and a couple of showers making sleeping easy.

Held a chemical-free work-shop brain storming session here and a couple of strategies came forth. It is partly in response to the increased visible spraying and injecting in the valley which has returned a considerable amount of out-rage from numerous land-holders. Some for the first time are thinking about what herbicides are doing to the water in run-off, now that we know for sure glyphosate is active in soil and water. Those of us who are regenerating degraded land, with-out chemicals, have learnt our responses from our observation as we go about our work.

Why not learn as you develop a reconciliation with the de-graded land most of us want to improve ? And what are you killing with your foliage sprays? Bees frogs, butterfly caterpillars ect ect ect ????

A considerable number of camphor’s have been poisoned near here and will pose a fire risk if we have the predicted dry autumn, winter and spring. The whole approach of the herbicide quick fixers is that they are not considering for a second the role camphor now play in sustaining many birds, butterflies and insects. If camphor had not replaced the indigenous trees we removed, white headed pigeons would not have survived.

Research now coming out of universities all over the world is pointing to herbicides contributing to serious ecological decline.
coral-tree-stump-2

This is a coral tree (Erythrina x sykesii) stump I have coppiced over the last three years. It takes little effort once the main tree is removed and you stack the branches off the ground. This amazing tree has the ability to reshoot from any part touching the soil. I enjoy doing my follow up with a sharp machete which easily removes any re-sprouting with a little clump from where it is reshooting. Usually and if the resprouting clump is removed it will not resprout from that point again.

coral-tree-stump
Ideas in the following blog (http://herbs-treatandtaste.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/indian-coral-tree-history-uses-and.html ) on adapting our thinking on how we view the Coral Tree.

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