Autumn.

 

Busy, busy, busy with the cooler weather. Garden catch up is my daily priority with the beginning of the harvest of galangal, turmeric, yacon and ginger.

Below, a waterfall still running.

water-fall

 

What a depressing week with the government about to call a DD election in July. Cynical politics and with a Banker PM and the scrutiny of the Panama papers, it could be an interesting 70 days of campaigning.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/apr/21/panama-papers-prominent-australians-call-for-action-in-open-letter-to-turnbull

More images have been released on the bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef alongside more reported clusters of Parkinson’s disease  and Alzheimer’s in heavily herbicide use farming areas.

Is it too late?

Lets hope the candidates, particularly any Green aspirants for political office, are carefully selected. Our own local Council election,  a candidate  who ran on the Green Party ticket  (Rose Wanchap) here in the Byron Shire and who deserted her elected role to the pro development side within 6 months of being elected, outraged and disappointed many Green electors.

http://gofossilfree.org.au/pfp-home

appearing-at-the-turn-off-Wilson-Creek-Road

 

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef ecosystem on our blue planet, and home to a vast array of marine plants and animals, including reef fish, sea turtles, sharks, hard and soft corals.

I’ve just come back from the Reef, and I was shocked at what I saw. I knew there would be bleached coral, but I had expected some patches of bleaching surrounded by mainly healthy, colourful corals.

I saw the opposite. The reef flat was a field of white coral as far as the eye could see. It was the face of climate change, and it was devastating.

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef ecosystem on our blue planet, and home to a vast array of marine plants and animals, including reef fish, sea turtles, sharks, hard and soft corals.

Imogen Zethoven
Great Barrier Reef Campaign Director.

And with most of the coral trees poisoned along the creek banks, we are expecting a visible change in the nectar feeding strategies of many birds along the valley.

coral-flowers-providing-winter-nectar Coral tree flower with a honey eater.

Photo by Rodney .

With the odd glimmer of realistic news.

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/apr/20/energy-consortium-offers-to-buy-110-gigawatt-hours-from-renewables

 

 

 

 

 

 

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