From the USA………..A battle coming to us soon.

Dear Don,

Happy National Pollinator Week! As we celebrate all that bees contribute — one in three bites of food, for instance — we’re also reminding policymakers that these and other vital pollinators are still in serious trouble.

Beekeepers have been sounding the alarm about bee declines for a decade now, and just this last year reported losing more than 40% of their hives. Bees need our help!

While there are multiple factors at play, it’s very clear that widespread use of bee-harming neonicotinoids is key part of the problem. And it’s a part of the problem the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can — and must — do something about.

Help us keep the pressure on EPA to protect bees from harmful pesticides!

While EPA has finally, finally started their review of the most commonly used neonics, they’re overlooking a critical piece of the puzzle: many conventional and genetically engineered seeds are coated with these chemicals before going into the ground.

The agency doesn’t technically define this as a “pesticide application,” so they’re skipping right over seed coatings in their review. But given that more than 90% of corn and over half of all soy planted in the U.S. is coated with neonics, this is a huge oversight.

Make sure EPA takes meaningful action on neonics.

Because these pesticides are “systemic,” they’re pulled up through the seed into all parts of the plant — including the nectar and pollen that bees collect. As study after study shows, neonic-coated seeds are a significant source of harmful pesticide exposure for pollinators.

Thanks to our collective efforts, pollinator declines are on EPA’s radar. But we need to keep the heat on this agency to ensure they follow the science — and take action that will truly protect bees from pesticides.

Thank you for keeping this important issue front and center!

Dear Don,

Happy National Pollinator Week! As we celebrate all that bees contribute — one in three bites of food, for instance — we’re also reminding policymakers that these and other vital pollinators are still in serious trouble.

Beekeepers have been sounding the alarm about bee declines for a decade now, and just this last year reported losing more than 40% of their hives. Bees need our help!

While there are multiple factors at play, it’s very clear that widespread use of bee-harming neonicotinoids is key part of the problem. And it’s a part of the problem the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can — and must — do something about.

Help us keep the pressure on EPA to protect bees from harmful pesticides!

While EPA has finally, finally started their review of the most commonly used neonics, they’re overlooking a critical piece of the puzzle: many conventional and genetically engineered seeds are coated with these chemicals before going into the ground.

The agency doesn’t technically define this as a “pesticide application,” so they’re skipping right over seed coatings in their review. But given that more than 90% of corn and over half of all soy planted in the U.S. is coated with neonics, this is a huge oversight.

Make sure EPA takes meaningful action on neonics.
Because these pesticides are “systemic,” they’re pulled up through the seed into all parts of the plant — including the nectar and pollen that bees collect. As study after study shows, neonic-coated seeds are a significant source of harmful pesticide exposure for pollinators.

Thanks to our collective efforts, pollinator declines are on EPA’s radar. But we need to keep the heat on this agency to ensure they follow the science — and take action that will truly protect bees from pesticides.

Thank you for keeping this important issue front and center!

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