Sunday, restful.

The garden is providing a wide variety of food for the kitchen. Beetroot is flourishing along with cabbages, kale, lettuces and tomatoes. Parsnip and carrots, earlier pruned by the wallabies, who learnt how to jump the fence, have bounced back.

The active ingredients found in common household weed killers such as Roundup and Yates can cause bacteria to develop a resistance to antibiotics, scientists have warned.
In a new study published in the scientific journal Microbiology, researchers from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand found that three of the most commonly used herbicides – glyphosate (active ingredient in Roundup), dicamba (found in Yates), and 2,4-D – caused E.coli and salmonella to become less susceptible to antibiotics.
Jack Heinemann, a professor in molecular biology and genetics, and one of the authors of the study, said the findings show that “bacteria respond to exposure to the herbicides by changing how susceptible they are to antibiotics used in human and animal medicine”.
Antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon where bacteria become unresponsive to treatments that were once highly effective in killing them – making common infections and diseases harder to treat and, occasionally, lethal.
The research, which builds on a 2015 study conducted by the same group that first established the link between weed killers and antibiotic resistance (also known as antimicrobial resistance), found that both the active and inert ingredients in the chemicals can cause bacteria to adapt to the harsher environment and hence become more resistant against antibiotics.

http://thenewdaily.com.au/life/wellbeing/2017/11/26/weed-killer-antibiotic-resistance/

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Huonbrook Herbicide Free Action.

Good Saturday morning effort with Robyn as we bagged the sparse jump seed from along side of the public road. A great effort over the years and we planned another working day next week to plant out a clearing Council has created above a road drainage pipe. The pipe is still seriously exposed and a danger to cyclists ( as I was yesterday) and vehicles if speeding.

Fungi on a log.

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Not much different to what I have seen here up our country roads.

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Ethiopian farmer loading pesticide in a backpack sprayer as he prepares to spray his onion field
While assessing pesticide use and safety in southern Ethiopia in 2015, I met a farmer as he applied pesticide to his onion crop. The crop looked great and he was applying protective fungicide together with an insecticide to ward of possible insect and disease infestations. I used pictures of this particular farmer on my website and blog posts and perhaps you are familiar with him. To me he represents part of a looming problem with pesticide use in Africa. Let me elaborate.
First, where did the water he used to mix the pesticide before application come from? The canal in the background in the picture was his water source, and you can see that it is murky. Those familiar with how pesticides work are wondering whether the pesticide application successfully controlled the pests because of the possibility of antagonism (where the active ingredient is tied up by elements within contaminated water).
Second, how was the cleanup performed after pesticide application was complete? The canal water was used for cleanup of equipment and disposal of excess spray solution.
Third, what other service did the canal waters provide? It was a source for potable water for the farmer and local community, and was also used for crop irrigation.

https://supesta.wordpress.com/2017/11/10/pesticides-and-the-environment-is-there-a-looming-crisis-in-africa

Left Bank Road spraying here in the Byron Shire.

Only difference this is sprayed from a tractor.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/andes-to-the-amazon/2017/nov/24/amazon-tribe-saves-plant-lore-with-healing-forests-and-encyclopedia

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Jump seed follow up. Hand weeding.

As we see more poisoning of camphor laurels and coral trees further into our valley, we are continuing with our jump seed hand weeding, Saturday  8 am at Mill Road to Wanganui.

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Australian Organics Demerge.

http://austorganic.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Australian-Organic-Demerge-Announcement_Revised.pdf

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2016/jun/28/atkins-ciwem-environmental-photographer-of-the-year-2016-the-winners-in-picture

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As I speak.

Posting on here yesterday that I have not seen a koala here for 2 years was proved wrong when this one arrived in a tree in front of the cabin.

https://www.echo.net.au/2017/11/defamation-action-delays-bluesfest-koala-reports/

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/24/queensland-farmers-suspected-to-have-defied-tree-clearing-controls-in-deforestation-frenzy

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From the Echo.

Council accused of koala habitat destruction at Tyagarah Airfield

Key koala habitat is being impacted by works at the Tyagarah Airfield and a petition, containing 281 signatures, to cease vegetation works at the site will be tabled at the upcoming Byron Shire Council meeting this Thursday.
The Tyagarah Airfield borders on a significant area of koala habitat for the Byron coastal koala population. The council removed 217 trees last May and are planning to prune a further 72 trees and shrubs at the end of November.
‘Before pruning work is undertaken a qualified wildlife ecologist will check the area for threatened species including koalas and occupied nests and drays,’ said Byron Shire Council’s manager open spaces and resource recovery, Michael Matthews.
‘If koalas or young birds and animals are found work will be delayed in that specific area until they have left on their own accord.’
According to local conservationist, Dailan Pugh, it is just the latest threat to the remaining koala population, many as a result of works and approvals by the council.
‘The Byron coastal koala population is estimated to number 240 individuals utilising patches of suitable habitat spread along the coast from Broken Head to the Brunswick River. They are vulnerable to both loss of preferred feed trees and fragmentation of their habitat.
‘The future viability of the Byron coastal koala population has come under sustained pressure in recent years, with: the development of the Bluesfest site; the redevelopment of Elements; the council’s refusal to build a koala underpass when widening the road and building the roundabout on Ewingsdale Road in the middle of the major crossing point; and the approval of West Byron.

Read more at the Echo. https://www.echo.net.au/2017/11/council-accused-koala-habitat-destruction-tyagarah-airfiled/

Koalas were frequently seen here but not any more. All these calls we hear for ‘ save the koala ‘ is a waste of time when we witness the disregard Councils and governments have for our remaining wild life. The illusion that we are a Green Shire is just that, an illusion. Hectares of camphors are being poisoned in our valley along with the coral trees. ITs fact that along with killing the trees, the habitat of many vital insects that have adapted to the environment since Europeans cleared, leeching into the soil and water is another ecological disaster.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/22/queensland-land-clearing-shown-in-aerial-and-satellite-images

 

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