Tag Archives: EDO.herbicide free future for Huonbrook

Autumn winter work schedule underway.

Busy 3 days with lantana slash pull, layer and mulch.

Its exciting as we head further up the steep banks and discover emerging rain forest seedlings as we go.

Yacon flower…………….Andes Apple……………..delicious eaten direct from the soil. Roasted or chopped into stir fry. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yac%C3%B3n

I have kilos available? Also turmeric, ginger, galangal and arrowroot. Message me.

 

http://www.monsanto-tribunal.org/Multimedia_1

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Knotweed in the UK.

Japanese knotweed cannot be cured, a major study which tried 19 methods over three years has found.

Researchers from Swansea University conducted the world’s biggest ever study into eradicating the invasive weed at two sites in Taff’s Well, near Cardiff, and in Swansea.

But despite using various chemical solutions, physical projects and a mixture of the two, the scientists found no definite ways of killing the plant completely using current methods.

Professor Dan Eastwood from the project said: “Basically, we’re discovering how best to tackle invasive plants in real world conditions, informed by evidence of what actually works. We began focusing on knotweed at a time when there was a great deal of hysteria surrounding it.

“At the time, most information for people affected by the plant was largely based on anecdote. This led to the prospect of unscrupulous companies offering expensive and ineffective treatment solutions.

“It was incredible to us that there was no long-term, large-scale field trial analysis of the treatment methods used to control Japanese knotweed.”

From the DT  UK.

Here too, where telestra and others use herbicide on their sites, within 3 months everything has returned.

Why not just hand weed or whipper snip?

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From PAN and the Monsanto and Bayer merger.

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2018/mar/08/bird-photographer-of-the-year-2018-in-pictures

From the USA.

National poll results released this week confirm that farmers across the country believe the merger of Bayer and Monsanto will be bad for farming and farm communities. As the Department of Justice considers its final decision regarding the merger, the poll demonstrates serious concern from farmers and some details about why many believe more consolidation will be harmful.
The weed crisis and accompanying dicamba drift epidemic of last year’s growing season were identified by many farmers as a major concern, and a problem that Monsanto cannot solve and a merger could further amplify.
Farmers say NO to merger
Nearly 1,000 farmers in 48 states, representing all sectors of farming, were asked about the pending merger, and more than 93% expressed concern, with top worries being increased pressure to practice chemical-dependent farming and reduced choice for purchasing seeds and other inputs.
Roger Johnson, President of the National Farmers Union, has this perspective on the pending merger:
Family farmers deserve fair prices, choices in what they plant, and the type of market competition that incentivizes firms to compete and innovate. A Bayer-Monsanto merger stands to move each of these factors in the wrong direction.”
Monsanto & dicamba drift
Last season’s dicamba drift crisis, with more than 3.5 million soy acres damaged by Monsanto’s latest seed/herbicide combo, no doubt elevates these concerns for farmers across the country.
Grain farmers are in a tough spot, thanks to so many years of the corporation’s RoundUp Ready crops spawning the current epidemic of herbicide-resistent weeds. Monsanto’s “solution” to this problem, of course, was Xtend — the dicamba cropping system that is causing so much collateral damage.
Prominent weed scientists predict that already-existing dicamba-resistant weeds will spread quickly, and that Xtend will not solve the weed problem RoundUp has created. It will, however, produce massive short-term profits for Monsanto through herbicide sales.
Widespread impacts & concerns
The survey results also reveal that:
More than 70% of farmers report heavier herbicide use due to resistant weeds;
Over 90% of organic farmers are concerned that pesticide drift will impact their ability to continue organic farming;
Over 11% of field-crop farmers had a recent dicamba drift incident; and
Over 10% of conventional farmers are considering buying Xtend seeds only to prevent dicamba drift damage to their own crops.
You can stand with farmers against the Bayer-Monsanto merger.

https://www.smh.com.au/environment/conservation/bungled-nsw-new-land-clearing-laws-deemed-invalid-by-court-20180309-p4z3lf.html

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Murray-Darling Basin. From the ABC online.

The head of the Murray-Darling Basin Authority (MDBA) has said the historic agreement to protect Australia’s iconic river system for the environment and agriculture is in danger of collapse.

MDBA chief executive Phillip Glyde told the ABC he was concerned the New South Wales and Victorian governments might act on their threats to potentially walk away from the Murray-Darling Basin Plan.

“It’s certainly under a lot of pressure at the moment,” he said.

“If it [the plan] does collapse, we go back to circumstances before 2012 where various state governments use water as they may wish, but it doesn’t look after the basin as a whole.

“It would undermine the food bowl of the nation, undermine us having a sustainable basin that is environmentally sound.”

The crisis was sparked when Federal Labor announced on Tuesday it would support the Greens’ bid to block a 70-gigalitre cut in the amount of water being returned to the environment in the northern basin.

The cut, supported by the Federal Government, was recommended by the MDBA, which said it would save 200 jobs in irrigation-dependent communities in NSW and Queensland.

NSW Water Minister Niall Blair said his Government was “deadly serious” about reconsidering its commitment to the plan.

What is the Murray-Darling Basin Plan?

The Murray-Darling Basin Plan has remained controversial ever since its introduction back in 2012.
He said the processes built into the basin plan for adjusting irrigation and environmental flows had been agreed to by all of the state and federal governments involved.

“But now, because outcomes don’t meet political desires or wants, some want to overturn the umpire’s decision,” he said.

“We’re really questioning whether we would bother with any of the other implementation of the plan, if it’s going to be treated like this.

“The hard work that’s been done bringing communities along for the difficult conversations, to then have it just thrown onto the scrapheap like this, I don’t know, we’d want to be in a position to put our communities through that again.”

But tensions are set to rise even further when Parliament considers the potential return of 605 gigalitres of water to communities in the southern part of the basin.

The MDBA said that was linked to greater water efficiencies, which would allow the same environmental benefits for less environmental flows, Mr Glyde said.

The Greens, however, have said they would also move to disallow that.

“All governments have signed up to that 605-gigalitre adjustment six months ago. If that was to fall over I think that would be the end of the basin plan,” Mr Glyde said.

“[That’s] because that method means we can achieve the environmental outcomes of the basin plan with much smaller economic impact.”

A spokeswoman for shadow water minister Tony Burke said Labor would have to read the fine print of any new Greens motion and take it to Caucus before deciding whether to support it.

Topics: government-and-politics, environmental-management, murray-darling-basin, rivers, irrigation, rural, enviro

https://www.statista.com/statistics/567250/glyphosate-use-worldwide/

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/feb/08/nsw-minister-altered-barwon-darling-water-sharing-plan-to-favour-irrigators

Here we are slowly regenerating the banks of Coopers creek. Seeding edge.

I must add that a month ago an indigenous man ( unknown to me) told me on the streets of Mullumbimby that the poisoning of Coral trees along the banks of Wilson Creek, is responsible for the deaths of platypus. 2 bodies were found that I know of soon after poisoning began.

 

From Fred.
Politicians will soon decide on whether or not to take more water out of the Murray Darling river system. They’ll look at facts, figures and graphs and maybe hear from some big irrigators. But I want them to know what this decision means to me and my people.

I am of the Murrawarri Nation in the Northern Murray Basin. Growing up, the river was our lifeblood. It was a place to fish, to swim and it’s the home of our sacred river red gum trees.

Our people talk about how life is reborn in the river red gums. We believe that spirits return to earth on the back of a falling star, and hide behind a bush near the birthing tree. A baby growing in its mother’s womb is waiting for a spirit, and as soon as the baby is born the spirit jumps into the baby giving it its first breath. The river red gums are sacred to us because we use the leaves to communicate to our ancestors in the sky camp. If the river red gums die, then so do our spiritual connections with our ancestors.

Growing up, the river would flood once every 3 to 5 years — what the gums need to stay healthy — but right now the floods only happen once every 15 years on average. The infamous Cubbie Station and the St George Irrigation area in QLD are able to take huge amounts of water from the system and the river is in a shocking state right now.

I want you to see it for yourself. Especially the Senators who will vote on whether or not to take more water out of the Murray Darling Basin Plan in the next week.

When parliament resumes, I’ll be in Canberra calling for more environmental water in the system and for the Murray Darling Basin Plan to be implemented in full.

Will you watch the video of the sacred river red gums I have a responsibility to look after for future generations? If you share it you’ll be strengthening my hand in Canberra ahead of the senate vot

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After 35 mls of rain.

Last week the gardens looked so wilted and dry I thought they would be a visual right off before my 41/70 celebration on the 10th of February. But after a day of on and off showers this morning it looks like this.

Snake bean flower.

Humans have been farming for 10,000 years. It was just about 60 years ago that we started industrializing agriculture in the U.S. and around the world. After World War II, chemical companies needed a market for wartime inventions and pesticides were put to work in the fields. In the decades that followed, trade and development policy — coupled with savvy marketing by chemical companies — effectively developed an entire model of industrial agriculture.
Today, pesticides touch every aspect of our lives, from residues on our produce to increased chronic disease to biodiversity loss. It’s time for a dramatic shift in our food and farming system.

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When will we ever learn?

On Christmas Day farmers around Walgett in north-west New South Wales noticed their infant cotton plants had begun to wither. Leaves began to curl and die, killing some plants and stressing others.

Within days, it was clear Walgett was facing a serious incident that had affected nearly 6,000 hectares (60 sq km) of cotton farms reaching as far as Burren Junction, and Rowena.

The culprit is believed to be a giant plume of 2-4,D, a pesticide that is used to kill broadleaf weeds in fallow fields and in some cereal crops. A few days earlier it had rained, which prompts the weeds to sprout and farmers began spraying – though who is responsible for the 2-4,D plume remains a mystery.

Herbicide 2,4-D ‘possibly’ causes cancer, World Health Organisation study finds
Read more
The spray, possibly used at night, is believed to have been trapped in an inversion layer in the atmosphere and then drifted over the highly sensitive cotton plants.

But cotton might just be the agricultural equivalent of the canary in the coalmine. Jo Immig, coordinator at the Australian Toxics Network said the effects of pesticide drift got public attention when cotton was affected and there were financial losses, but off-target spraying was probably affecting other areas, such as bushland, national parks, waterways and population centres, without attracting the same sort of scrutiny.

“It’s not as obvious when it’s in other parts of the environment. The regulators haven’t had nearly enough concern about pesticide drift and its impacts,” she said.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jan/18/nsw-cotton-growers-facing-complete-crop-loss-after-alleged-pesticide-drift

Spraying along Left Bank Road, Byron shire.

What herbicides kill.

Thanks to Tannon for  the stunning photos taken here on his mobile phone.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/jan/18/2017-was-the-hottest-year-on-record-without-el-nino-boost

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/100677186/toxic-algae-more-deadly-than-cobra-venom-and-delicious-to-your-dog

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Organic.

More than 300 pesticides are permitted in conventional agriculture, and some may combine in a harmful cocktail effect. So for your sake and the planet’s, go organic. These are the UK statistics, Australia’s could be even more than 300.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/dec/03/the-eco-guide-to-greener-veg

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