Tag Archives: herbicide free

Silvereyes.

Not a very good photo but the best I could get. New camera too so learning my way around its possibilities. I have never seen so many silvereyes as are about here every morning.
new-camera

Yesterday too a single Lyre bird scurried into the brush in one of my regenerated gullies. Too fast to photograph. Not sure whether it was an Albert or a Superb. Great joy at seeing it, however briefly.

http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/2848400/its_not_just_glyphosate_and_neonicotinoids_why_we_need_a_pesticidefree_future.html

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Gathering momentum.

http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/2904602/endgame_for_glyphosate_the_global_fallout_of_whos_probable_carcinogen_classification.html
roundup_ready_blood_gmos

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/roundup-weedkiller-banned-from-french-garden-centres-over-probable

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Getting really involved.

Byron Shire Chemical Free Landcare, next working bee will be on Saturday, the 20st of June, from 9 am to 1pm, at Brunswick Heads Crown Land Reserve site. Meet at the end of South Head Road fire track gate. If you come later, walk 150 m along the beach from the dog walking beach access track, heading South and turn west into the dunes. We will be there, doing follow up work of Bitou Bush and Glory Lily. Please wear boots, long sleeve shirt and long pants, a hat, gloves and bring water and some morning tea. We will celebrate winter solstice at morning tea as it will be one day to go before the sun, a generous star that warms our soul returns our away.
More information please call Nadia 0478272300 or go to http://www.byronshirechemicalfreelandcare.org.

I watch a wedge tail eagle chased out by 2 crows.
crows-and-a-wedgetail

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Have your say.

Not that I hold much value to surveys due to past experience with Council Surveys. This one we can tell Council what us rural dwellers’ consider important and vent some of our frustration. Like pot-holes, herbicides used in drains, not mowing of verges ect ect.

http://www.byron.nsw.gov.au/rural-land-use-strategy
A inspiring interview on Radio National, on what we call a weed.
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/blueprintforliving/whats-in-a-weed/6445812

Severe erosion following the poisoning of Coral trees along the banks of Wilson Creek.
erosion,following-poisoning-of-coral-trees,-wilson-creek

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From the WEEDs News.

Agricultural intensification has led to the decrease of the diversity of wild and domestic pollinators. For instance, honeybees declined by 59 % in 61 years in the USA. About 35 % of major crops in the world depend on pollination services, and 3–8 % of world crop production will disappear without pollinators. Indeed, pollination provides several ecosystem services such as enabling crop and honey productions, regulating weeds and other cultural services. Agricultural intensification has also decreased weed diversity by about 50 % in 70 years because massive herbicide sprays have reduced the competition between weeds and crops. Nevertheless, weeds are at the basis of agricultural foodwebs, providing food to many living organisms. In particular, weeds provide flowers for pollinating insects including honey and wild bees. Here, we review the decline of weeds and bees. We discuss the effect of bees and pollination on crop production. We describe the complex interactions between bee pollinators, e.g. honey and wild bees, and landscape habitats such as crop fields and semi-natural elements. For that, we focus on spatial and temporal effects on flower resources. We show that weed abundance can reduce crop yields, thus inducing conflict with farmers. But weed abundance enhances regulating services by ensuring the survival of honeybees in the absence of oil seed crops. Weed abundance also enhances pollination services and, in turn, honey yield for the benefit of beekeepers. Weed abundance has also improved the survival of wild flora and the socio-cultural value of landscapes, a major request from the public. From those findings, we present a conceptual framework allowing to define ecological engineering options based upon ecosystem services of weeds and pollinators. [Retagnolle, V., & Gaba, S. (2015). Weeds for bees? A review. Agronomy for Sustainable Development, 1-19] Com

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Bio-diversity with-out herbicides.

[The Quarterly Review of Biology March 2013] — “Several years ago, I attended a seminar on the psychology of the animal-liberation movement. The speaker observed that although very few animal-lib activists were actually religious, most such people scored very highly on the “religiosity” scale in personality inventories. He suggested that animal liberation served the same functions for such people as religion did for many more: it gave life meaning and conferred a group identity centered on shared moral superiority over others. After years of interacting with “weed warriors”—people who spend their free time trying to eradicate “invasive species” from parks and public lands—I would advance the same hypothesis about most of them. They tend to be absolutely convinced of the righteousness of their cause and highly resistant to any suggestion that naturalized exotics might not be all bad. They also tend to be oblivious to the disconcerting degree to which their rhetoric converges to that of racists and xenophobes, and highly defensive if you point that out to them. After all, they are on the “green” side, right?

Time we learnt to adapt to climate change.
http://weedsnetwork.com/traction?type=digest_html&proj=WeedsNews&sdate=20140913&edate=20140925
Survey.

Council is currently reviewing the Byron Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and wants to hear from the community about their views and aspirations for managing Byron Shire’s biodiversity values. The first stage of the community consultation is a survey.

The survey will only take 5 – 10 minutes to complete and the responses will be considered as part of the Strategy review.

The survey can be completed online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SZGR7DK

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Come along for a herbicide free experience.

It is a great feeling to remove the Bitou from the front dunes uncovering treasures like Knotted Club Rush (Ficinia nodosa), a sedge that grows naturally in Australian dune environments. So this coming Saturday, the 27th of September, Byron Shire Chemical Free Landcare will be in at Brunswick Heads Crown Land Reserve, lopping Bitou Bush on the front dunes, from 9 am till 1:30 pm. Meet at the fire track gate at the end of South Beach Road near the surf club. If you come later, walk along the dog walking track to the beach, head South for 50 m and you will spot us. We are on to the last leg of primary work. Looking great. Thanks to all our volunteers. New volunteers are welcome. We have 15 pairs of loppers, so if you have some spare time and want to learn how to restore the dunes using our chemical-free strategy please come and join us.

Please wear boots, a long-sleeve shirt and long pants, a hat, gloves and bring water, a picnic and beach gear. More information please phone 0478272300 or email byronshirechemicalfreelandcare@gmail.com or go to http://www.byronshirechemicalfreelandcare.org

!cid_ii_1489059d4964d913
Coral tree providing nectar for the honey eater.
Photo taken 20th September 2014 by Rodney Weidland.

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/offtrack/grumpy-scientists/4369260

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Back to physical work.

Sun is shining after another 45 mls of rain. Cool. Recovery from my Anaphylaxis reaction to a dodgy peanut has taken a few days. The physical fall when I blacked-out has caused some discomfort but a good work out slashing and layering lantana has sorted the balance out.

regrowth,-wild-peach,-celery,-cedar

The above photo shows the abundant regrowth of red and white cedar, wild peach, celery wood, native tamarind and numerous other rain-forest species. Following the initial removal of lantana, regrowth of mist and crofton, bracken and wild raspberry follow under which rain-forest species find a shelter nursery cover to sprout.

walk-to-work

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Contrast.

contrast

track-edge

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Herbicide-free landcare increasing.

Friends of Success Hill Reserve and traditional owners, the Swan River Peoples, are pleased to announce the success of their non chemical weeding activities at the Success Hill Reserve in Bassendean, Western Australia. Jane Bremmer spokesperson for Friends of Success Hill Reserve said, “The Bassendean community, especially our children, will benefit from the work we have done here in removing weeds without resorting to harmful chemicals. The community and sensitive river ecosystems have not been exposed to chemical spray and vapour drift, there are no nasty chemical residues left behind in the environment and there has been no risk to the health and regeneration of native species. This is a win-win situation for all.” Success Hill elder Bella Bropho said, “Our sacred site already looks better for the work we have undertaken. It is reassuring to know that our sacred areas have not been poisoned with chemicals, an issue we are very concerned about because of the importance of the Swan River and freshwater streams that exist here at Success Hill to our people. It is our responsibility to protect these areas for our culture and future generations.” .

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/jul/11/organic-food-more-antioxidants-study

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